Blog Archives

Blogging from A to Z Challenge: P is for…Jenny Pike (#AtoZChallenge)

Welcome to my April 2020 Great and Powerful Blogging from A to Z Challenge!

Jenny Pike (1922-2004) was an Canadian photographer, a servicewoman in WWII, and “was one of a groundbreaking wave of female recruits to the Forces during World War II. She was among the first group of young women to be trained as photographers and photo technicians, and helped to process the first pictures of the invasion to liberate north-west Europe – known as D-Day.” (https://navalandmilitarymuseum.org/archives/articles/paving-the-way/jenny-pike/)

I was very interested to read about Pike, as she lived and worked (and died) here in Victoria, where I also live.  But, I was bound to be frustrated in my search for her photography as I could not find any examples.  So, I guess it’s a short post from me this morning…

Resources:

Jenny Pike at Wikipedia

Jenny Pike at the Naval Military Museum

Thanks for visiting my 2020 A to Z Challenge – Letter P.  You can find links to more blogs participating in this challenge at A to Z 2020 Challenge Master List (Google Docs).

Blogging from A to Z Challenge: O is for…Catherine Opie (#AtoZChallenge)

Welcome to my April 2020 Great and Powerful Blogging from A to Z Challenge!

Catherine Opie (1961- ) is an American photographer who will perhaps not be everyone’s cup of tea.  Some of her photos (especially her self-portraits) are definitely, in the words of the New Yorker, “unnerving”.  Opie “is so prominent in the Southern California art world that friends call her “the mayor of Los Angeles,” but her photographs have remained quietly subversive. ” (https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/03/13/catherine-opie-all-american-subversive)

A fine-art photographer, and “[b]est known for her color portraits, Opie’s work explores the strata of our society by focusing on particular groups such as high school football players, S&M leather participants, and LGBT communities. ” (http://www.artnet.com/artists/catherine-opie/)

I haven’t decided how I feel about Opie’s work, but look forward to exploring more – and I’ll leave it up to you to check out her work for yourselves.

Resources:

Catherine Opie at Wikipedia

Catherine Opie at ArtNet

Catherine Opie at the Guggenheim

Catherine Opie, All-American Subversive

Thanks for visiting my 2020 A to Z Challenge – Letter O.  You can find links to more blogs participating in this challenge at A to Z 2020 Challenge Master List (Google Docs).

Blogging from A to Z Challenge: N is for…Natalie Naccache (#AtoZChallenge)

Welcome to my April 2020 Great and Powerful Blogging from A to Z Challenge!

Natalie Naccache is a Lebanese-British documentary photographer based between Dubai and Beirut. I don’t know much about her, but I am intrigued.  What I do know is that she is young – I believe she is in her thirties.

It was hard in my basic (read, lazy) searches to find female photographers who weren’t American, but once I saw Naccache’s colourful photos, documenting real life and real people in Lebanon, I knew I needed to include her.  I look forward to seeing where her career takes her.

Resources:

Natalie Naccache

Natalie Naccache on Instagram

Natalie Naccache on Visura

The Beirut fashion school making education free Pivot Points: Stories of Change

Natalie Naccache at the Photographic Museum of Humanity

Thanks for visiting my 2020 A to Z Challenge – Letter N.  You can find links to more blogs participating in this challenge at A to Z 2020 Challenge Master List (Google Docs).

Blogging from A to Z Challenge: M is for…Mary Ellen Mark (#AtoZChallenge)

Welcome to my April 2020 Great and Powerful Blogging from A to Z Challenge!

Mary Ellen Mark (1940-2015) was an American photographer “best known for her documentary images of 1960’s counterculture. Her work highlighted Vietnam War protesters and societal outcasts in order to underscore their importance in contemporary society. ” (http://www.artnet.com/artists/mary-ellen-mark/)  I loved this statement about Mark, who “was transparent with the subjects of her photography about her intent to use what she saw in the world for her art, about which she has said “I just think it’s important to be direct and honest with people about why you’re photographing them and what you’re doing. After all, you are taking some of their soul.” (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Ellen_Mark)

Make sure to check out her work on her website (http://www.maryellenmark.com/).  I am once again in awe and admiration of a photographer working with people the way Mark obviously did, telling their stories through her photographs.

Resources:

Mary Ellen Mark

Mary Ellen Mark at Wikipedia

Mary Ellen Mark at ArtNet

Mary Ellen Mark at ICP

Thanks for visiting my 2020 A to Z Challenge – Letter M.  You can find links to more blogs participating in this challenge at A to Z 2020 Challenge Master List (Google Docs).

Blogging from A to Z Challenge: L is for…Dorothea Lange (#AtoZChallenge)

Welcome to my April 2020 Great and Powerful Blogging from A to Z Challenge!

Dorothea Lange (1895-1965) was an American photographer, and you’re all going, here’s a name I know!!  Yes, Dorothea Lange – the photographer most famous for her stark photographs from the 1930s – of the Great Depression.  Her documentary photography continued, after the Depression, and “[f]ollowing America’s entrance into World War II, Lange was hired by the Office of War Information (OWI) to photograph the internment of Japanese Americans. In 1945, she was employed again by the OWI, this time to document the San Francisco conference that created the United Nations. ” (https://www.biography.com/artist/dorothea-lange)

Her work is stunning, and sad, and tells stories of endurance in the face of desperation.  “While Lange sometimes grew frustrated that her work didn’t always provoke society to correct the injustices she documented, her photography has endured and greatly influenced generations of documentary photographers.”  (https://www.biography.com/artist/dorothea-lange)   and generations of photographers in general.

Here is one of her iconic images, in the public domain.

Migrant Mother

And one of her WWII works

Grandfather and grandson at Manzanar Relocation Center (public domain)

Below are only some very few of the many, many websites and articles about Dorothea Lange – I encourage you to see what else is out there!

Resources:

Dorothea Lange at Wikipedia

Dorothea Lange at MoMA

Dorothea Lange:  Drawing Beauty Out Of Desolation

Dorothea Lange at Biography.com

Dorothea Lange at ICP

Thanks for visiting my 2020 A to Z Challenge – Letter L.  You can find links to more blogs participating in this challenge at A to Z 2020 Challenge Master List (Google Docs).

Blogging from A to Z Challenge: K is for…Gertrude Käsebier (#AtoZChallenge)

Welcome to my April 2020 Great and Powerful Blogging from A to Z Challenge!

Gertrude Käsebier (1852-1934) was an American photographer, best known “for her evocative images of women and domestic scenes.” (https://www.britannica.com/biography/Gertrude-Kasebier).  Käsebier began attending art school at 37, after marrying and having three children.  I think it’s amazing that she moved herself and her family around (in those days!), attending various art schools and studying abroad.   Many of her most famous portraits were of Native Americans, but “[u]nlike her contemporary Edward Curtis, Käsebier focused more on the expression and individuality of the person than the costumes and customs.” (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gertrude_K%C3%A4sebier)

Over the years, she worked closely with Alfred Stieglitz, and before they had a falling out, they worked to establish the Women’s Professional Photographers Association of America.  I quite like her portraits, as they are not your typical, staring at the camera formally kind of portraits.

Wife of American Horse, Dakota Sioux (public domain)

“Portrait of the Photographer,” manipulated self-portrait by Gertrude Käsebier (public domain)

Resources:

Gertrude Käsebier at Wikipedia

Gertrude Käsebier at J. Paul Getty Museum

Gertrude Käsebier at Encyclopedia Britannica

Gertrude Käsebier at MoMA

Thanks for visiting my 2020 A to Z Challenge – Letter K.  You can find links to more blogs participating in this challenge at A to Z 2020 Challenge Master List (Google Docs).

Blogging from A to Z Challenge: J is for…Frances B. Johnston (#AtoZChallenge)

Welcome to my April 2020 Great and Powerful Blogging from A to Z Challenge!

Frances B. Johnston (1864-1952) was an American photographer and photojournalist, known for portraits of African Americans and Native Americans, but also for her photographs of significant events, and architecture of the American south.

“Frances Benjamin Johnston was described by The Washington Times as “the only lady in the business of photography in the city.” Considered to be one of the first female press photographers in the United States, she took pictures of news events and architecture and made portraits of political and social leaders for over five decades.” (https://www.moma.org/artists/7851)

Her portraits are quite formal, and I found myself must more interested in her architectural, artistic, and photojournalistic work, as it, for me, embodies what photography is by nature – a snapshot of the times.  For example,

Salon jury, Philadelphia (public domain)

Michie’s Old Tavern (public domain)

Frances Benjamin Johnston (public domain)

Resources:

Frances B. Johnston at Wikipedia

Frances B. Johnston at the MoMA

Frances B. Johnston at the Library of Congress

Victorian Womanhood, in All Its Guises

Thanks for visiting my 2020 A to Z Challenge – Letter J.  You can find links to more blogs participating in this challenge at A to Z 2020 Challenge Master List (Google Docs).

Blogging from A to Z Challenge: I is for…Graciela Iturbide (#AtoZChallenge)

Welcome to my April 2020 Great and Powerful Blogging from A to Z Challenge!

Graciela Iturbide (1942- )is a Mexican photographer whose “photographs reveal the daily lives, customs, and rituals of Mexico’s underrepresented native cultures.” (https://nmwa.org/explore/artist-profiles/graciela-iturbide)  “Iurbide’s powerful portrayal of Mexico comes at a time when its people are the subject of intense political debate across the border, as US President Donald Trump continues to push efforts to divide and fortify with an imposing wall.” (https://www.cnn.com/style/article/graciela-iturbide-mexico-photography/index.html)  In addition to pure photography, Iturbide also works in mixed and multi media

I find Iturbide’s photography incredibly beautiful;  hauntingly real portraits of people and places that are very personal, and I am looking forward to exploring her work more.

Resources:

Graciela Iturbide

Graciela Iturbide at Wikipedia

Graciela Iturbide at ICP

Graciela Iturbide at the National Museum of Women in the Arts

Graciela Iturbide’s images reveal untold stories of indigenous Mexico

Photographer Graciela Iturbide: ‘I notice the pain as well as the beauty’

Thanks for visiting my 2020 A to Z Challenge – Letter I.  You can find links to more blogs participating in this challenge at A to Z 2020 Challenge Master List (Google Docs).

Blogging from A to Z Challenge: H is for…Hannah Hoch (#AtoZChallenge)

Welcome to my April 2020 Great and Powerful Blogging from A to Z Challenge!

Hannah Hoch (1889-1978) (and please excuse me missing the umlaut over the “o”.  It’s been a really really long day (and week) and I just didn’t have the energy to do more than get this post done) “was a German Dada artist. She is best known for her work of the Weimar period, when she was one of the originators of photomontage.” (a kind of mixed media) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hannah_H%C3%B6ch)

What I liked about exploring Hoch’s work is that I have never really looked closely at photomontage before, and I was quite taken with the images she created, and I especially liked the Guardian’s description of her work “as a pioneer of photomontage and a feminist icon who took a kitchen knife to the glass ceiling” (https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2014/jan/09/hannah-hoch-art-punk-whitechapel)

Here is an example of her work in the public domain:

Hannah Höch. German, 1889-1978
Cut with the Kitchen Knife through the Last Weimar Beer-Belly Cultural Epoch in Germany (Schnitt mit dem Küchenmesser durch die letzte Weimarer Bierbauchkulturepoche Deutschlands). 1919-1920
Photomontage and collage with watercolor, 44 7/8 x 35 7/16” (114 x 90 cm)
Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Nationalgalerie
© 2006 Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz, Berlin,
© 2006 Hannah Höch / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, photo: Jörg P. Anders, Berlin

Cut with the Kitchen Knife Dada through the Beer-Belly of the Weimar Republic, 1919,

Hannah Hoch (CC BY-SA 4.0)

Resources:

Hannah Hoch at Wikipedia

The Radical Legacy of Hannah Höch, One of the Only Female Dadaists

Hannah Hoch at the MoMA

Hannah Höch: art’s original punk

Hannah Hoch at the Art Story

Hannah Hoch at WikiArt

Thanks for visiting my 2020 A to Z Challenge – Letter H.  You can find links to more blogs participating in this challenge at A to Z 2020 Challenge Master List (Google Docs).

Blogging from A to Z Challenge: G is for…Laura Gilpin (#AtoZChallenge)

Welcome to my April 2020 Great and Powerful Blogging from A to Z Challenge!

Laura Gilpin (1891-1979) was an American photographer most well known for her photos of Native Americans, but also for her sweeping Southwestern landscapes.  I love her images of life and a time long gone.

“Laura Gilpin applied compassion to the relationship between the landscape and the native people, a trait that distinguished her from most male landscape photographers of the West. Many still regard her as the only significant woman landscape photographer of her time.” (https://www.cogreatwomen.org/project/laura-gilpin/)

Here are a couple of her images, in the public domain.

Sunday After Church,1919

Mission Church at Rancho de Taos

Resources:

Laura Gilpin at Wikipedia

Laura Gilpin at Colorado’s Women Hall of Fame

Laura Gilpin at Britannica

Laura Gilpin and the Tradition of American Landscape Photography

Laura Gilpin at Scheinbaum & Russek Ltd (you can see several of her works here)

Laura Gilpin on ArtNet

Thanks for visiting my 2020 A to Z Challenge – Letter G.  You can find links to more blogs participating in this challenge at A to Z 2020 Challenge Master List (Google Docs).

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