Blogging from A to Z Challenge: T is for…Gerda Taro (#AtoZChallenge)

Welcome to my April 2020 Great and Powerful Blogging from A to Z Challenge!

Gerda Taro (1910-1937) was a German-Jewish war photographer who is known as the first female photo journalist to die in the field, covering the front lines in WWII.  ““One of the world’s first and greatest war photographers,” writes Giles Trent at The Guardian, Taro “died while photographing a chaotic retreat after the Battle of Brunete, shortly after Franco’s troops had one a major victory,” just days away from her 27th birthday. ”  (http://www.openculture.com/2019/06/meet-gerda-taro-the-first-female-photojournalist-to-die-on-the-front-lines.html)

Not surprisingly, given the subjects, her photos are stark, brutal, and honest.  I haven’t had a chance to read all that I found online about her, but look forward to going back when I have time.  Now, here are some images, in the public domain, for you:

Republican soldiers in June 1937. during the Spanish Civil War.

A 1937 image by Ms. Taro of Republican soldiers at the Navacerrada Pass in Spain.

Gerda Taro, anon.  (Public Domain)

Resources:

Gerda Taro at Wikipedia

Gerda Taro at the International Centre of Photography

Gerda Taro: The First Woman War Photographer to Die in the Field

Meet Gerda Taro, the First Female Photojournalist to Die on the Front Lines

Gerda Taro: The forgotten photojournalist killed in action

Thanks for visiting my 2020 A to Z Challenge – Letter T.  You can find links to more blogs participating in this challenge at A to Z 2020 Challenge Master List (Google Docs).

Posted on April 23, 2020, in A to Z Challenge, photography, Photos I took, Writing and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. 6 Comments.

  1. I think she has had the most interesting history so far. What fantastic photos she took….sadly, so young….

  2. wow- I had not heard of Gerda before. Fascinating how she met up with Robert Capra and worked alongside him- sad that she died so tragically and amazing how many people lined the streets and mourned her death in Paris. Her photos are blunt and to the point about the war and being right in there with the soldiers. Thanks for posting her history and images!

  3. The Newseum in Washington DC (which has since closed) had an amazing display of war photography. It was so powerful. Weekends In Maine

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